Citizen Science Programs

CITIZEN SCIENCE PROGRAMS:

California Native Plant Society Open World Field Guides

http://fieldguides.cnps.org/

The Open World Field Guides Project is an online network of student and citizen created field guides that detail the plants and creatures of many different regions. You can contribute to this collection of nature knowledge by creating and sharing your own field guide! Once you have completed your guide, you can share it on this website so that other people can learn from your work. You may download and explore other people’s guides to other areas, as well. Site includes how to instructions. Great combined with their downloadable Opening the World Through Nature Journaling, Integrating Art, Science and Language Arts (see above).

Cornell Lab of Ornithology-Bird Sleuth, Crossing Boundaries, Feeder Watch, http://www.birds.cornell.edu

eBird– global tools for birders critical data for science. http://www.ebird.org

Journey North– a global study of wildlife migration and seasonal change. http://www.learner.org/jnorth/

Monarch Watch– nonprofit educational outreach program based at the University of Kansas that focuses on the monarch butterfly, its habitat, and its spectacular fall migration.

http://www.monarchwatch.org

Project Budburst-a network of people across the United States who monitor plants as the seasons change. We are a national field campaign designed to engage the public in the collection of important ecological data based on the timing of leafing, flowering, and fruiting of plants.

http://www.neoninc.org/budburst/

The Great Sunflower Project-The world’s largest citizen science project focused on pollinator conservation www.greatsunflower.org/

The USA National Phenology Network- brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. The network harnesses the power of people and the Internet to collect and share information, providing researchers with far more data than they could collect alone.

http://www.usanpn.org/